Demand High But Medical Specialists Not Finding Work In Canada

Thats what the public has paid me to do and thats what I want to do. Unfortunatley, if I cant find those opportunities in Canada, Ill have to look elsewhere. Some of those stymied in their job search are trained in areas like oncology and orthopedic surgery where governments have invested hundreds of millions of dollars in recent years to expand services and reduce patient delays. But while provincial governments have paid to train more specialists in those high-demand areas, hospitals and health regions often lack the money to hire them once they hit the job market, experts say. Others argue there is a disconnect between the divvying up at medical schools of specialty training positions, called residencies, and the real-world patient demand for the graduates various services. The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons which oversees and sets standards for medical specialties has already catalogued a list of high-unemployment specialties. It includes not only oncology and orthopedics but cardiac surgery, nephrology, neurosurgery, plastic surgery, otolaryngology the ear, nose and throat field and public health and preventive medicine. We thought, Wow, this is a really surprising list, said Danielle Frechette, the colleges health-policy director. Its paradoxical to have ongoing issues with wait times and cancelled surgeries and able-and-willing bodies to meet those unmet needs (who cant find work). The Royal College is currently surveying recently graduated residents on the issue and has so far discovered that one in five have failed to find full-time work, prompting them to take locums temporary fill-in jobs for absent doctors work part time, or return for further, sub-specialty training. Half the 1,500 respondents to a recent survey by the residents association reported they were moderately to extremely concerned about finding work, said Dr. Adam Kaufman, president of the Canadian Association of Interns and Residents. The group has even started a program, Transition into Practice Service (TIPS) to help get positions for newly trained specialists. Of 35 doctors who recently completed training in radiation oncology, only a handful have found jobs in Canada and three have already left for the United States, said Dr. Loewen. During a typical TIPS session at Queens University in Kingston, Ont., one pathology trainee said he had already been told there would be no positions in the province when he finished next year, said Bryan MacLean, a project manager with the program.

click here to read http://news.nationalpost.com/2011/09/19/demand-high-but-medical-specialists-not-finding-work-in-canada/

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